Grammar Games

the-ultimate-list-of-free-grammar-games

This comes from psychowith6.com

Nouns Basketball Pronoun Game – basketball-themed board game teaching he and she pronouns to young or special needs learners.

Make it Plural! – Students have to give the plural form of nouns in this board game.

Post It Note Noun Hunt – Players find Post It Note nouns and sort them into person, place, and thing categories.

I Have…Who Has? Plural Nouns Game – This game is played like Go Fish.

Irregular Plurals Card Game – This game is played like Go Fish. Students ask if the other players have the singular or plural form of the noun to make a match.

Grammar Game for Plurals and Possessive Nouns – Students compete with different colored markers on a dry erase board to write the most plurals and possessives in categories.

This is just a sample of the long list of games she has gathered on her homeschooling blog.

Describe the Scene – School and Classroom

We’re starting a new school year. I’m starting off with all the vocabulary associated with schools. The nouns: pencil, desk, teacher. The verbs: stand up, raise your hand, read and write. For grammar, I’m starting at the beginning, which for me is Present Continuous. Here are some Describe the Scenes for school and the classroom.

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05Classroom

streetscene

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copy-of-pre-school-classroom-scene-pre-schoolyoung-children

For vocabulary, English Worksheets does it the best:

Places at School

Classroom Objects

Classroom Language

Rhythm Sticks

Again, the Jbary ladies have another great song using Rhythm Sticks. Here they use the same song from This is the way… except using different action verbs with the sticks. Easy to learn, fun to do, and even the children can come up with their own verses.

Their ideas came from Kendra at: http://klmpeace.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/toddler-storytime-rhythm-sticks/

This blog entry is worth a read. She explains very well the different activities and songs that can combined with rhythm sticks. Being in Russia, I often have to make do with out many things. We take for granted how easy it is to buy supplies in America.So for these songs I am using pencils. They aren’t as long, as thick or have that great wood sound like these sticks. But, they are still fun to beat on things.

This is the way…

Daily Routines – every age level has this lesson. My adult students work from the Cambridge English Vocabulary in Use . My older children build out their own schedules. My youngest students get this song)

This song and dance combine the verb + noun and an easy to recognize action. I try to incorporate a bit of sign language with my younger students to give them context clues. I arrive and say, I must wash my hands, while rubbing my hands together. The song format makes it very easy for you to add your own words and actions. The kids can even add their own.

 

Key phrases

There are three key phrases I teach all my beginning students, regardless of age.

I don’t know!

Shrug

Number 1 on my list. I want my students to speak English as much as they can. I would rather them say I don’t know over and over again, then for them to answer me in their native language. I teach them in the very first lesson how to throw up a shrug, stick on the bottom lip and mumble IdunnOh. I want to teach them it’s OK to make mistakes and it’s OK to not know. That’s why we have lessons.

What’s this? It’s a…

WhatsThis

 

The most basic sentence structure is noun + verb. I like my students to ask questions, to explore the language in their own way. This is true of children or adult of any age. Like I don’t know I want them to use English as often as I can. Teaching this phrase early on allows them to stay in English even when they don’t know what something is called. I teach this phrase through ad-nauseam, like most of my phrases. I also use the exact same intonation every time.  I also do not worry about plurals or singulars (What’s this?  vs. What are these?). Even toddlers learn to mimic this question.

After they have learned this, then I add the correct demonstrative adjectives (this, that, these, those).

What are you doing? I’m —ing.

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We need some verbs to go with our nouns. The most commonly used verb tense, although not the easiest, is Present Continuous. This is what we use to say what we are doing right now. Action verbs are the most relatable, easiest to show, and the most fun to do.

Once we’ve learned this form, we can begin to build our vocabulary with different verbs.

That’s it!

Now we know how to make a basic noun + verb sentence and I don’t know how to fill in the gaps. We build from there.

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